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of several historical novels he spoke for a little more than an hour in jackson, mississippi. >> the reason for me to be in jackson maybe more so than any other is what took place 40 miles west of here and that is what i want to talk about tonight. at vicksburg, so this is quite a story and even some people around here don't know it. that is great fun for me but i need to start out talking about something that i always mention whenever i'm doing any event like this. i am quite sure that at least some of you have some interest in the civil war for one reason, because at of some time many years ago perhaps you read a book called the killer angels. every time i say that i see people nod their heads. you have no idea what the killer angels is that's okay. it's not required. i'll explain it to you quickly. the killer angels was written by my father and came out in 1974. it is the story of the battle of gettysburg. now with the killer angels is not is the history of the battle of gettysburg. it's not a history book. it's the story as told to you from the characters themselves and not just any cha
to coach under saints boss peyton. breeze 1 mississippi 2 mississippi 3 mississippi 4 mississippi. got all day to find a receiver and hit stills. 14 of 18 for 202 yards. 17 nothing saints. buck 24 on the money due to moore. raiders down at the half. then defense comes through. quarterback wallace hit hard by 7 round pick bass. robinson for the scoop and score but raiders fall in new orleans 28-20. cal football team open up the season in just two week against northwestern. have a true freshman taking the snap head coach dikes has named goff the starting quarterback today. 4 star recruit out of may run catholic high school. big guy. 6 foot 4 very consistent. he can thank his dad jerry for the strong am. major league pitcher never pressured his son. >> s when i was younger i raised me to play the fwaip. talk to him before the game he said have fun. i try to do. have if you please do my job and play football. >>reporter: a open up a weekend series with cleveland tonight. chance to gain some ground on first place texas because the rangers lost early this evening to seattle. thi
a century in the making. edith hill cannon grew up in the '60s in mississippi. >> as much as my parents tried to protect me, you couldn't escape discrimination. >> reporter: do you ever forget the discrimination? >> uh-huh. no. >> reporter: she listened to a who's who of celebrities and politicians including the daughters of two presidents, lynda johnson robb and caroline kennedy and two former presidents, jimmy carter and bill clinton. >> this march and that speech changed america. they opened minds, they melted hearts and they moved millions. >> reporter: the event included a recreation of the 1963 march through the streets of washington that ended at the lincoln memorial. setting up a nearly five-hour program under cloudy skies and periodic rain. congressman john lewis returned today, the only speaker here to share the stage in 1963 with dr. king. >> this moment in our history has been a long time coming but a change has come. >> reporter: bill tate says he was here, too, 50 years ago. that day when dr. king made that speech, what were you thinking then? >> i knew we were in a moment
to have anita thompson here, from mississippi, because 48 years ago, there were drive-by shootings at headstart programs in her state, and some toloyers were threatening not send their children to headstart. we have come some way, and we have a ways to go. and earlyeadstart childhood education programs were serving a scant 40% of all eligible children. waiting lists or long. -- were long. rising fixed costs and rent, energy. we have almost always operated at the margins because it seems inconceivably -- inconceivable not to spend every available dollar on providing the best quality program for every possible child. when the unthinkable happened and sequestration became the new reality this march, we had little left to cut. you recently saw -- you have likely seen the recent report that over 57,000 fewer children will be served in head start and early head start next year because of the sequester. this is not a small number. numbercrunching thinkers in our team figured out that 57,000 people would fill a football stadium at the university of louisville. they would fill 1900 school m
every hill and molehill of mississippi and from every mountain side. . i'm angela, and i didn't think i could quit smoking but chantix helped me do it. i told my doctor i think i'm... i'm ready. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. i knew that i could smoke for the first 7 days. i knew that i wasn't putting nicotine back into my body to try to quit. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these, stop chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these, sp chantix and see your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. tell your doctor if you have a history of heart or blood vessel problems, or if you develop new or worse symptoms. get me
she wore for the 1963 march. she remembered the opposite progression in her native mississippi. >> coming no north for the marc, and the federal government on the conditions down south did, in fact, give us th the bear brd base of support. >> crediting the civil rights movement for gay lesbian rights, yet there was the recognition of unmet goals of 19th 63. >> reporter: 50 years later these marchs are repeating the same demands economic and political. jobs and justice. president obama acknowledg acknd progress had stalled. those inequities would have to be tackled in every level of society. >> the successful man who doesn't have to but pays his workers a fair wage and then offers a shot to a man, an ex-con, who may be down on his luck. he's marching. >> reporter: he talked about the politics of division that polarize the government. >> gay rights have been critical of coca-cola sponsorship of the olympics in russia. it accuses coca-cola of supporting hate because of its support of olympics. >> we go to the world's oldest film festival. >> reporter: the high octane glamour of th
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
be in mississippi or anywhere else. -- trent would like people to think he would rather be in mississippi or anywhere else. he's in a position to do very well here. in that clip we showed jim van i -- >> the executive director of "politico." >> you quote him. he is contemptuous of washington's it used to be better reflects. -- reflex. what is he saying there? are we old-timers worthless? jim is putting forth the view that the age at which the 20 boys on the bus are setting the agenda in their one story they write or file a day are over. of the missions of "politico" is to democratize the conversation. 100,000 people can read mike allen every day. everyone can blog about it. what jim was saying is that there is this wild west. there is this notion that the conversation has been broken open. disparaging, as especially of the body types of my forbearers in the journalism world. he was probably just trying to draw a sharp contest -- contrast. >> is there such a group, middle-age, left of center, overweight men who decided how the way all of us see politics and governance. you can. -- >> -- ca
teenager on vacation in mississippi. is it is a new day, but the day isn't over. the struggle for the civil rights for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago closed the books on the last century. well, when the book closes on the 21st centu
understand that we have a lot of partners there joining us. .ost: brookhaven, mississippi republican. i don't like what y'all are doing on this. you are showing pictures and to do all and how kinds of things. i do not think you all should be doing this. stoph y'all would please showing this on tv. terrorists watch tv. i am highly upset. host: go ahead. guest: maybe i can give you can' come for. this is at a 30,000 foot level. there are much more details that go into it than what i can even describe your today. that there is a great deal of security in and around the ports and ports around the country. the federal government is doing a good job. host: all the information is public information? guest: it is. host: at what point does the government come into play? what it is here, who takes over security? host: security is a joint venturer. when it is under water it is mainly coast guard. when it reaches the earth it is port authority and customs. reporting scanning and certain it isners that open it, federally managed. the state portion as to make sure they are secure. republican caller. hi,
songs. ?let freedom ring." from stone mountain of georgia, and every hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capi
shelton was up for it. this was a guy who was born in mississippi. he grew up on a farm in a cotton. he had a lot of different jobs through his life. he was tough as nails and he joined the military when he was 18 years old. he joined as a private and went to korea and saw action right away. he was wounded three times, won the silver star. he came back and decided i love the military. i'm going to make this my career. the only time he left the military was back just before you got married. he decided he was going to try farming again. the military had a policy that you can leave the military for 90 days and returned -- if you return within 90 days you would get your previous rank but after 90 days you have to go back to being a private and at the time he was a sergeant. on the 87th day he returned because farming in mississippi was just too hard and love to the army life and he missed it. so, he decided since he was going to make it a career he was going to do more than learn as much as he possibly could. so at 28 years old to cut off age for becoming an officer, he applied for officer
to go back. all of that plus breaking news. there was a miracle today in oxford, mississippi. reinforced with scratch- resistant glass and a unibody made kevlar strong. okay google now. call my droid. the new droid ultra by motorola. when strength matters, droid does. ♪ the joint is jumpin' osteo bi-flex® helps strengthen your joints.° like calcium supplements can help your bones, osteo bi-flex can help your joints.° osteo bi-flex... the best stuff in the joint.™ now in joint and muscle formula. >> shepard: u.s. senator ted cruz says nothing against canada but is he an american. he was indeed born in canada but his mother is a u.s. citizen. he says he actually has dual citizenship both countries. now he plans to give up the canadian citizenship. senator cruz recently won a straw poll of 2016 conservative denver. made two trips to iowa. home of the nation's first in the nation presidential contest and staffers say this week is he planning to visit new hampshire. the first primary state san diego mayor bob filner is trying to settle a sexual harassment lawsuit against him from the c
on the death list in mississippi and he took it upon himself to train our children what to do in case they heard gunfire. that's exactly what they did that night. each other helped each other to the bathroom to get in the tub and my screams stopped them from completing that hiding point. but we knew, you live with death threats constantly and you adapt your life to that. you might argue, but you don't leave without the embrace. you might become angry with things that are happening around you, but it's a time of support. it's a time of pulling people together. and during that time, we had the ages divided. there were the young people and there were the older people. those in the middle were more or less teachers who were a little afraid to speak up and stand out. medgarr stood alone in that battle. he did have supporters, of course, but he was the point person and it was extremely difficult for us as a family to live with that. but you lived as though every day was going to be your last together. it sounds a little sad but that's the way it was. >> one of your themes in your speech on
of the mississippi river, but the southeast is getting too much rain. lhat will mean higher food bills, and here's manuel bojorquz. >> can rained again in cordell, georgia, they call themselves the water capital of the world. dell,renshaw has grown them here for 30 years. >> it's the wettest year i've seen. >> reporter: rainfall totals in many parts of the southeast are nchenches above normal. produce that grows close to the neound or on vines have been heavily damaged. waterlogged melons here, split open, rot or lose flavor. law you can tell? >> you see is that brown around the edge of it? that water just running off? >> reporter: half of crenshaw's crop is ruined. se thinks he's facing $1 million n losses. in a drought, you can irrigate. >> right. ut weporter: but when you have this much rain what, can you do? >> there's nothing you can do. you can't take the water away. >> reporter: the melons that aren't any good end up at packing houses like the ones thed by danny wilcher. july is supposed to be peak season. r. we shut down for two weeks. >> reporter: and that hasn't happened in how long? >
that these were phoneo scandals like the mississippi river they keep rolling and keeps getting bigger. i think the republicans are doing well. i think they are very methodical and are not hysterical. they are pursuing it and it will take time but they are pulling on it a thread at a time. >> what about that? if it starts expanding beyond the irs that starts to become more of a problem for the administration. >> they are not supposed to share information but the threat would be that they are sharing information for political purposes to undermine conservatives. in this situation that is not clear. they shared it with the enforcement division of the federal elections commission. so there could be a legitimate reason to see if somebody has tax exempt status to see what they are requesting and then requesting similar status from irs. we don't know. but the idea is and i think that there was testimony from lerner that there had been no sharing of data whatsoever. so now we have an exception to the rule apparently and of course that compounds all the suspicious about lerner and the fact that she has
york, but i'm a mississippi girl. i like the braves. >> a view on a-rod, playing tonight. not playing well. but he has $175,000 after being exposed as a cheat. >> i think he could care less at this point. he's made a ton of money. set some records. he feel, ah, my legacy is set in other ways. i could care less what would michael have thought? not a lot, i suspect. >> jo think he was really at the top of michael's list of concerns in life. michael was believer in fairness and i don't think he would have approved of a-rod necessarily. >> were you surprised by the incredible outpouring of attention that michael's death got? the tributes and accolades that came? >> i think it's a real testament to his legacy and what he stood for, and you know, what a passionate supporter he was of liberty, of human rights, of freedom. of the right to free speech, and so i was definitely, it meant so much to me. all the lovely thing that people, and your tribute. thank you so much for that, too. >> an incredible force. a brave, courageous man. it's desperately sad. for us, everyone in the media and the vi
who don't know who emmett till is. a 14-year-old black kid in mississippi, 1955 and flirted with a white woman and a few days later two white racists attacked him and shot him to death. now this is who she is comparing this to, trayvon martin. i feel like oprah diminished her brand here. it was a big missed opportunity for oprah winfrey. i was expecting her to take the high road and elevate the conversation and to bring the country forward and add a little unity here. instead she made this atrocious analogy and i am a little disappointed in oprah. >> that was an awesome chandelier. banned phrase. decimate. did we discuss this in the a block? i must have got 150 tweets telling me exactly what decimate means and that the president was using it incorrectly. i disagree. he was using it correctly. to decimate is to kill every 10th man. so technically 90% of al-qaeda is still in operation. president obama is saying, yes, we have 10% and we have 90% left. that's all i want to do. >> technically that's what he meant. so stop using decimate. >> if we stop using the words you tell us
traveled to mississippi where marijuana is illegal, but here on the campus of one of the country's oldest universities, ole miss, a huge stash of marijuana is under lock and key. >> this is our vault. >> this is some pretty tight security. look at this door. >> mahmoud runs what's called a marijuana potency project. what's the potency of this? >> this is about 8%. >> for three decades now his team has analyzed weed confiscated from drug busts. >> this is 36% thc. you can smell it. it has a good aromatic smell. >> how much is this worry you, 36% thc confiscated? >> very dangerous material. for someone that is not experienced in marijuana smoking takes some of this, and they're going to go into the negative effects of the high, the psychosis, the irritation, irritability, paranoia, all of this. >> while not all the plants are this high, there's no question he has seen a trend. in 1972 the average potency was less than 1% thc. now it's nearly 13%. >> are people becoming more obsessed with high thc marijuana? >> i think so. they're starting out with a half a percent and 1%, and they get a goo
rescues along the beach. the choppy surf driven by the winds. >>> southern mississippi is drying up after almost six inches of rain fell in two hours. cars stuck and fire crews having to come out to help all the people. officials there handed out stand bags to protect the homes at risk of being inundated with the water. >>> can you imagine this? people went to church. by the time they left, the parking lot was full. some of they had waded out to their cars. the water did eventually go down and they were able to head home. >> good gracious, this is incredible. not that we are blaming you, but we are looking for explanations. >> this is incredible. at this point, month after month. we started this trend of drenching the southeast in june. july, setting records. it is august and we are still talking about an incredible amount of tropical moisture. the influx into the south. you can see, this is the area we are watching. each day, that moisture got closer. combined with a stationary front, they brought together unbelievable amounts of rainfall. i want to show you how far over the average, alo
. make no mistake, president obama believes there mississippi be accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons against the world's most vulnerable people. nothing today is more serious and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. thank you. >> i'm trace gallagher in for shepard smith. just heard secretary of said john kerry giving his first accounts of the crisis in syria. the secretary delivers litany of what they believe is the proof that chemical weapons were used in syria. as important as what he laid out is what when he did not lay out, is a time line of dealing with syria, going after the regimes. what the did lay out there have to be consequences for any action, any chemical weapon used and said the president at some point in time will decide what to do but made it very, very clear the secretary of state believes there will be some type of action used against sirra, but keep in mind, we have u.n. inspectors on the ground, and seemed to indicate that did not matter. the inspectors would fine there was the use of chemical weapons but could not determine
. you saw selma in the 1965 voting rights act. you saw the mississippi summer project in the 1964 civil rights bill. you saw affirmative action, you saw all of these things grow out of that. you saw an effort to empower marginalize eed people across te country. we used the model we were using in terms of organizing and sex-determination pulling people together so they could take control of their own lives. those models were actually both things that grew out of the movement. washington is one of those epic points that there are a number of other epic points that actually pulled this whole process together. i think it's important to understand that even on the struggles on the march on washington, get the message out. >>ifill: we are still having big national conversations as they say about race, still coming out of the trayvon martin episode. and i wonder as you look back we wonder whether it's leadership that's missing, whether we're just not honest as a people in discussing these issues or whether we've come much further than they give us credit for? >> i think we have come a long way
're not breaking the law. the kids wish network has faced fines before in utah and mississippi. the fines, all those fines added up to a little more than $6,000. >> unbelievable. how that woman sleeps at night and she's there shaking your hand and acting like everything is proper. this kid's wish network, they have been around a long, long time. >> since 1997, and listen to this, this is interesting. it began with a different name. the fulfill a wish foundation, which sounds a lot like make a wish, right, anderson? >> yeah. >> the folks at make a wish actually sued forcing fulfill a wish to change the name. that's how they got to the kids wish network. we found that as quite common, too. the less than forthcoming charities they want names that sound very much like respected charities. >> the bottom line, there are good charities out there. people can go to charity navigator to find out actual ratings of charities. >> you really should. the last thing you should do is have the phone ring and find a telemarketer on the other end asking you for money and telling you all the great things they're g
, kansas, massachusetts, maryland, michigan, minnesota, mississippi, montana, new hampshire, new mexico and washington state. >> good for mississippi. >> bill: how about that. unfortunately, there are still too many kids who are suffering from obesity. one in eight preschoolers in the united states is obese according to the cdc. a third of u.s. children and teens and still more than 2/3 of adults. so you know, we're not out of the woods yet but some good news on that front. president obama talked about this last night with jay leno and he gave some credit where i think credit is due. >> obama: to michelle's credit, the let's move initiative that she's been involved with, that has gotten so many folks all around the country doing stuff to help kids exercise and eat right, for the first time in a long time, we've started to see some modest reduction in childhood obesity. [ applause ] >> bill: very important cause that the first lady has taken on. i think she's done a damn good job of it. and she's had people in the white house. she's done videos. you know what? it's working! we just gotta
first discovered the following places: florida, the pacific ocean and the mississippi river? do those come to the top -- would you know, jon? jon: two of those, i know. jenna: oh, please. jon, of course. if you're like the rest of us -- [laughter] don't feel bad if you're stumped without using the internet. so were we, quite frankly, and to make it worse, these questions are from a test administered to kentucky schools in 1912 to eighth graders. eighth graders. david strange is the executive director of the bullet county history museum located in shepherdsville, kentucky, and the only thing that made me feel sort of okay is knowing that you, the smart guy at the museum, also had to turn to the internet -- [laughter] to find out some of these answers. how difficult was it? >> well, i remember, i actually remember most all of these questions or similar to them being taught and asked when i was in high school -- jenna: oh, come on, you weren't around in 1912, david, please. [laughter] >> no, but when i was in high school, in the '60s and '70s, i remember being taught them. now, rememberi
klux klan skyrockets, you have the mississippi codes, which began in 1877 and were crystallized in 1901. it deprived blacks of being able to own property. restricts voting rights. for example, in mississippi. and i think in 1871, 97% of african-american men can vote in the state of mississippi. when hayes and's reconstruction, 10 years later, less than 1.5% of african-american men can the.the violence, intimidation, the grandfather's clause, the poll tax. it is really two separate nations where african-americans emboldened by frederick douglass in the north began to really organize and begin to secure the rights while the south have theirs stripped away.>> mike is watching us in honolulu. you are on. go ahead. >> can you hear me? >> yes, thanks. >> it is hawaii standard time. i have a direct relative to my grandmother, of course.her name is jesse hayes. she was born in 1870. in the lower midwest.probably, by blood, long removed. i looked at this beautiful lucy sitting in the chair, looking at the camera with those big eyes, and her beautiful children looking at the camera. obviously,mpr
today? -- is a catfish legend in mississippi. >> we can do 400,000. >> 400,000 in one day. >> yes. >> a lot of fish. >> a lot of fish. >> reporter: one of the biggest catfish processors in the country. one of the driving forces for getting the u.s. department of agriculture to get it here. critics call that a huge waste of millions of your tax dollars because there is one big problem. you have fda inspecting? >> that's not correct. we have fda all right, a nonexistent inspection. >> reporter: believe it or not, two federal agencies are supposed to inspect the same fish. the usda spent $20 million for planning the inspections. while there have been concerns about the adequacy of inspections of imported fish in the past, do we really need usda inspection too? >> there are food safety concerns. >> catfish is a cat fish is a catfish. a safe food. >> reporter: one of the foremost food safety experts, former fda and usda official who says catfish is not a high risk food and fda should continue to be in charge of inspecting it. >> certainly isn't public health. the only thing you are lef
in meridian, mississippi in an integrated school. and went to school at university of alabama at a very integrated campus and at a campus that in the 1980s was actually handling racial issues a lot better than a lot of campuses across the northeast. but martin luther king not only did for america but what he did for his home region of the south, a region that had been scarred by racism and racial tensions for years. to see how quickly things -- he gave this speech the year i was born in a segregated south and segregated america. by the time i started first grade in meridian mississippi it w was integrated. that is nothing short of extraordinary and that is a legacy that we put first at the feet of martin luther king and also all the civil rights workers and protesters and leaders who gave their all to make sure that white children like myself and black children who were my friends, who i played football with in first grade and baseball with in first grade, would go to school together. that was the normal. that was normal for me. let me -- al, let me go to you quickly here. it is incredi
was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary --ace because emmett till was because emmett till was murdered there. and yet, when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. host: michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. caller: yeah, hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who they are in good complaining -- -- quit and planning. guest: who was complaining? caller: well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- guest: why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain you know, get over what happened in the past. guest: you are from th
, mississippi, at "the advocate," a historically african-american newspaper. but "the advocate" had a history of being firebombed, a fact that worried his mother, so that did not last long. mr. jealous was also the executive director of the national newspapers publishers association, which represents african american focused, owned, and operated newspapers. what may have been his biggest advocacy challenge is how he courted his wife and the struggle to keep her and win her over with little money and a new job in d.c. he succeeded, however, and is married to lia, and the couple have two young children. but at the core of what mr. jealous is speaking about today, yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. five decades since martin luther king spoke, the nation has its first black president, but still has serious issues for the african-american people, including record incarceration, double digit unemployment, ballot box suppression, and youth violence. the killing of trayvon martin brought back racial concerns to the front pages. questions remain if the naacp, like m
tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from mississippi rise? >> mr. speaker, unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, i'm not a fan of government mandates, and neither are my constituents in mississippi. but there is one mandate that the people of mississippi sent me to washington with, to repeal, replace, dismantle, delay, and defund obamacare. i have heard from families, small businesses, and hardworking americans across my district who all have the same message -- this law is a train wreck. mr. palazzo: that is why one of my very first votes in congress was to repeal obamacare. that's why i voted to repeal it nearly 40 times over the last three years. that is why i introduce add constitutional amendment to restore the right of the american people to refuse this bad law. that is also why i firmly believe we must defund obamacare in a continuing resolution this body will take up later this year. i believe this is a fight worth fighting for mississippi. and
's the deal for those of you that don't know, 14-year-old black kid in mississippi, 1955, flirted with a white woman. a few days later, two white racists attacked him, shot him to death. this is who she is comparing trayvon martin. i feel like oprah diminished her brand. it was a missed opportunity. i was expecting her to take the high road and elevate the conversation and bring the country forward and add a little unity here. but instead she made this atrocious analogy and i am a little disappointed in her. >> i will say that was an awesome chandelier. >>> banned phrase. decimate. we discussed it in a block. i must have got 150 tweets telling me exactly what decimate means and that the president was using it incorrectly. i disagree, he was using it correctly. to decimate is to kill every tenth man. 90% of al qaeda is in operation because president obama says we have 10%, 90% left. >> that's technically what he meant. >> using decimate. >> if we stop using the words you tell us not to use, we can't talk any more. >> i want to ban every single word. >> get out. throw to "special report." >> tha
well is somewhere in mississippi. >> in that clip, we show mike allen and jim vaned high whose job is -- >> the executive director of politico. >> you quote him in here. this quote came to you from him? >> i'll read it. >> jim vaned high is contemptuous of washington -- it used to be better reflex of how he relates to news. he said it was largely, and this is true for decades, a small group of middle age left of center overweight men who decided how all of us should see politics and govern us. what is he saying there? so we old timers are worthless. >> he's setting the view that those 20 boys on the bus setting the agenda in the one story they file in a day are over. its's to demock rattize the discussion. anyone can tweet or blog about it. i think what jim was saying there is that there is this wild west. there is this notion that the conversation is broken open. i wouldn't be disparaging of the body types of my forebearers. but he -- so i think that he was probably just trying to draw a sharp contrast. >> was there such a group around here? a small group of middle aged -- i don't
stone mountain of georgia, let freedom ring. from every mole hill -- >> from mississippi, from every mountainside -- >> let freedom ring. and i think people all across america in their hearts believe that freedom should ring for everybody. >> free at last, free at last, thank god, almighty, we are free at last. >> incredible. byron is here with us now. george, this was really one of the defining moments of the 20th century. >> it was. martin luther king said rightly, he appropriated american rhetoric, saying, i'm not trying to change america, i'm trying to reconnect with the american past. and in that sense, he did a wonderful job. >> well, you know, the whole idea of forming a more perfect union. over the centuries, we have tried to perfect this union. this was a moment of really trying to perfect it. mightily. but there was tremendous fear. i remember it very well. my father was majority whip of the congress at the time, a deep southerner, very close with president kennedy. and the fear of violence that was -- that was palpable, and the fear that it would ruin the cause of civil ri
parts of the mississippi belt. it is about flea increasing literacy rates basically eliminating gender disparity in educational aspects and one fact of the progress is almost completely unappreciated in the last is the way that access to higher education includes a status iranian women. especially that westerners would consider this unacceptable in their own societies and the majority of universities are now female. the majority of them are now female. and women's presence is now felt across many disciplines. notwithstanding, we had this with no direct connection on the ground and a cadre of so-called iran experts, many of whom are ex-patriots were iranian americans will flood the revolution in don't see the islamic public. they continue to misinterpret the iranian politics. telling us that the system is on the verge of collapse. we will continue to lose ground in the middle east. and a good example in 2009 we will have an office of wishful thinking on the green movement that emerged out of this campaign, it is solving america's strategic problem for the middle east. they did so even t
at the forecast rainfall across the region, across the mississippi river valley and lower ohio valley we could see the potential for heavy rain, special across arkansas an in towards tennessee where we could see 6-12 inches in a very short period of time. still hot, still summertime across the southern plains. 98 in dallas, 98 in shreveport. 98 in houston, what it feels like, it's oppressive. 103 t in houston, 102 in san antonio. they are used this kind of weather. dallas, your forecast average right now is 97 degrees. another day of hundred degree heat and then we'll be slightly below average with some thunderstorms in the forecast. >> gregg: it's beautiful here in new york. it's unbelievable. it's in the 80s. >> spectacular with hardly any humidity. one of those days, we should have called in sick. >> gregg: it's jammed outside on sixth avenue. dominican day parade. great day for it. thanks very much. >> heather: in indonesia meantime, crews are searching for two children after a volcanic eruption, at least six people were killed when lava flowed into a village. the head of disaster agency they
: mississippi, alabama and north carolina are trying to move sea head. but colin powell is among those who claims these will make voting more difficult. >> these procedures to slow the process down and making it likely fewer hispanics and african-americans will backfire. these people will come out to do what they have to do to vote and i encourage that. >> reporter: the justice department is trying to stop the spread by taking texas to court. bill: about five minutes before the hour now. crossing the red line. all eyes on the pentagon. syria said to be launching chemical weapons. the big question now. will the white house lead or follow. martha: the new fallout for the so-called thrill kill after young australian ball player. what the governor of oklahoma is saying about the silence from the president. >> he was such an amazing person. i'm going to miss him forever. but i'm really glad i got the four years with him. golden opportunity sales event and experience the connectivity of the available lexus enform, including the es and rx. ♪ this is the pursuit of perfection. ♪ help the gulf
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